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Post No.: 1007effect

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

So Furrywisepuppy and I – two intrepid mini space explorers – have been drawn into tracking a strange, fuzzy otherworldly signal coming from a nearby star system. The signal is becoming more amplified as we approach it at half the speed of light, but it’s still too noisy to interpret, even after compensating for the blueshift.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Are we doing the right thing or should we be heading home now?

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

We’ve still got a bunch of psychological effects not yet probed before in this series of posts to investigate, and they’re all in this direction anyway.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

According to the navigation console, the heuristics that we detected in Post No.: 0950 were back at that last nebula. Then it does indeed say take the next left to reach the final frontier of our space expedition.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Our course is set then…

 

Assembly bonus effect – this describes roughly the way that, usually, ‘the whole is greater than the sum of its parts’ whenever we work as a group.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Bouba/kiki effect – this relates to how we non-arbitrarily map speech sounds to the visual shapes of objects, like ‘bouba’ to a rounded blob shape and ‘kiki’ to a sharp star shape.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Cinderella effect – how there’s apparently a higher incidence of child abuse and maltreatment by stepparents than by biological parents.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Cocktail party effect – how we can manage to focus on one auditory stream of information despite being in a room full of other noise, like when listening to a friend talking during a loud party.

 

This might be something that many autistic people cannot manage to do so well hence why they feel overwhelmed in crowded places with lots of noise?

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Coolidge effect – how animals (mostly male ones) can express renewed sexual interest whenever a new potential mate is introduced, even after having sex with prior but still available sexual partners!

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Crespi effect – this describes, in classical conditioning, how a conditioned response changes disproportionately to a suddenly altered reinforcement. For instance, if the food given to a fluffy mouse as reinforcement to complete a task changes from 1g to 6g, the mouse’s level of performance will become greater than if 6g of food had been given from the start; and vice-versa.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Cross-race effect – the tendency for those from one ethnicity to have more difficulty identifying individual members from ethnicities other than their own i.e. assuming ‘all them lot look the same’. Regularly getting used to seeing different individual members from these ethnicities will reduce this effect.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Diderot effect – how we purchase items that align with our sense of identity and thus complement each another, plus how obtaining a new possession often creates a spiral of ever more consumption. Consequently, we buy stuff that our previous selves never needed or demanded to feel happy or fulfilled.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Dunning-Kruger effect – incompetent people can fail to realise they’re incompetent and thus can overestimate their own abilities. Meanwhile, since competent individuals may falsely assume that others have an equivalent understanding as they do, possessing actual competence may weaken one’s self-confidence.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Face superiority effect – how people perceive and encode human faces as one holistic unit as opposed to according to each individual feature like the eyes, nose and mouth.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

False fame effect – a type of source-monitoring error whereby, in experiments, if we’re presented with a list of non-famous names then later presented with the same names but alongside some new non-famous and famous names too, we’ll likely misidentify some original non-famous names as famous.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Fan effect – how sometimes our error rates or recognition times worsen the more information about a concept we obtain. (‘Fan’ here refers to the number of associations correlated with the concept.)

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Florence Nightingale effect – a trope whereby a caregiver falls in love with their patient. But these feelings may fade once the patient no longer requires care.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Flynn effect – the substantial and long-sustained increase in both fluid and crystallised intelligence test scores observed across industrialised countries over the 20th century; although this trend may have ceased now.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Hawthorne effect – the way we tend to modify some aspects of our behaviours when we know or think we’re being watched.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Hedonic adaptation or treadmill effect – how people tend to quickly return to their relatively stable ‘set point’ of happiness despite major positive/negative events or changes occurring in their life. Woof.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Hypersonic effect – the claim that, although humans cannot consciously hear ultrasonic frequencies, these frequencies nonetheless affect them physiologically and psychologically. If loud enough, people can certainly feel infrasound.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Kewpie doll effect – describes how a child’s physical features, like relatively large eyes, a lengthened forehead and rounded face, motivate a caregiver to care for an infant.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Kuleshov effect – when watching films, viewers often derive more meaning from the interaction of two sequential shots than from a single shot in isolation.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Lady Macbeth effect – priming feelings of shame might possibly evoke a need to physically wash oneself.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Lawn dart effect – in aviation, after a pilot accelerates at more than one standard gravity, the effect on their vestibular system leads them to perceive that the aircraft is climbing.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Martha Mitchell effect – how people are often accused of being mentally ill just because they make statements that we disagree with. This means that a misdiagnosis can occur if a doctor mislabels a patient’s accurate perceptions of real events as delusional.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Matthew effect – how advantages tend to accumulate, thus ‘the rich get richer and the poor stay/get poorer’.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Microwave auditory effect – how some humans claim they can perceive audible clicks or even speech directly inside their heads when hanging around pulsed or modulated radio frequency signals.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Missing letter effect – when people are tasked to consciously find specific target letters while reading text, they tend to miss more letters in frequent function words, like the ‘h’ in ‘the’, than in less frequent content words.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Mozart effect – the claim that listening to classical music will help temporarily boost your IQ score. If true, it appears to work with any kind of energetic and positive emotional music.

 

The claim that exposing babies or infants to classical music to boost their mental development is totally unfounded though.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Novelty effect – how our performances can initially improve when new technology is instituted, merely in response to an interest in that new technology rather than any real improvement in learning or achievement.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Over-justification effect – happens when an expected extrinsic incentive, like money, reduces a person’s intrinsic motivation to perform a task. Intrinsic motivation can thus become crowded-out. Also, the potential result of ‘turning play into work’ is that if the extrinsic reward is later removed, one may no longer feel like doing what one used to do under intrinsic motivation, hence the extrinsic incentives must now continually be offered to motivate us to sustain the activity.

 

For instance, one may have liked to cook as a hobby, but then it became one’s paid job. And once one lost that job, one didn’t feel like cooking for free anymore.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Perruchet effect – when a disconnect is demonstrated between one’s conscious expectation of an event and the strength or speed of one’s response towards it.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Placebo and nocebo effects – how believing that some intervention will benefit us will help make it feel like it is benefiting us, and how believing that some intervention will harm us will potentially make it feel like it is harming us, respectively.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Precedence effect – when a sound is followed by another, separated by a very short time delay that’s below the listener’s echo threshold, they’ll perceive a single auditory event. The perceived spatial location is dominated by the location of the sound arriving first.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Purkinje effect – how the peak luminance of the human eye shifts towards the blue end of the colour spectrum when illumination levels drop. Consequently, reds will appear darker relative to other colours as light levels decrease.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Rashomon effect – how each of us sees and remembers certain events differently. Related to naïve realism.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Ringelmann effect – the inclination for individual members of a group to become increasingly less productive as the size of their group increases.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Sleeper effect – the claim that there’s a delayed increase in the persuasive effect of a message that’s accompanied by a discounting cue (like a disclaimer or something else that attenuates the credibility of the message).

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Social facilitation – how being in the presence of others raises one’s individual task performance compared to working alone.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Spotlight effect – overestimating how much others notice our appearance or behaviour. But everyone else is too focused on themselves to notice!

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Stockholm and Lima syndromes – the notion that one will form an emotional bond with one’s captors if one is the captee, or will form an emotional bond with one’s captees if one is the captor, respectively.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Stroop and Simon effects – the difference in reaction time and accuracy between congruent and incongruent stimuli, like naming the colour of a green-coloured word ‘green’ versus naming the colour of a purple-coloured word ‘green’. And the difference in reaction time and accuracy between trials in which stimulus and response are on the same side compared to trials in which they’re on opposite sides.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Tamagotchi effect – the development of emotional bonds with machines or software agents.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Tetris effect – arises when we spend so much time and attention on an activity that it starts to invade our thoughts, mental images and dreams.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Thatcher effect – how it becomes harder to detect local feature changes in an upside-down face compared to a right-way-up face.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Ventriloquism effect – how the perception of speech can sound like it’s coming from a direction other than its true direction because of the influence of visual stimuli from an apparent speaker. It’s an example of visual capture, whereby the visual takes dominance over other sense modalities.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Venus effect – an example of naïve physics, wherein we can believe that someone looking at us via a mirror is looking at themselves, even though we’re not directly behind that individual.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Wagon-wheel effect – in videos, due to the frame rates and refresh rates, a propeller can appear to rotate differently from its true direction.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Werther effect – how the knowledge of a suicide can serve as a trigger for the next susceptible person to copy that act.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Westermarck effect or reverse sexual imprinting – a hypothesis that claims that people tend not to be attracted to any peers with whom they’ve lived with, like siblings, before the age of six.

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Word frequency effect – we’re faster at recognising words that are seen more frequently than less frequently.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Word superiority effect – we’re better at recognising letters presented within words compared to isolated letters or letters presented within non-words, pseudowords or pseudohomophones like ‘lorpy’ or ‘lyphe’.

 

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Wait, how come our equipment didn’t detect this massive black hole that we’re heading straight towards?!

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

That mysterious signal must’ve been jamming our sensors! It must’ve been a trap!

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

If we cross the event horizon, we’re going to get spaghettified! Gulp.

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

I like spaghetti – with pomodoro sauce (no garlic) – but I don’t want to become it!

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

We’re heading right towards it at such a speed, we’re now too close. And the gravitational pull of the black hole is too strong for us to steer away in time!

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

We’re doomed!

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

****!

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Puppy(!)

 

Furrywisepuppy says:

 

Pardon my language. Woof!

 

Fluffystealthkitten says:

 

Is this game over for us? Meow!

 

(The transmission ends)

 

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